Creatine And The Brain

Max Effort Muscle

Creatine is the most well-researched supplement ever made. It has a wide array of benefits including strength gains, stamina improvement, and muscle building due to its ability to improve ATP production. Recent research has shown a new benefit of creatine, cognitive improvement.

Your brain acts a lot like most muscles do. If you use your brain for a very intense activity and cause a lot of mental stress, your brain will need more ATP and fatigue more quickly. Mental fatigue will cause a decline in cognitive function. The brain can use creatine to regenerate ATP more quickly, this is shown by cognitive testing causing an acute drop in the brain’s phosphocreatine levels. Supplementing with creatine will keep the level of phosphocreatine in the brain higher for longer, acting as a cognitive booster. Supplementing with creatine will elevate your body’s phosphocreatine stores. Most people have some amount of phosphocreatine storage from dietary sources but diet alone will not supply enough creatine to raise the level of phosphocreatine in the brain. Greater levels of phosphocreatine in the brain show boosts in cognition as well as protection against neurological diseases. It can also reduce cognitive decline associated with aging, and reduce the side effects of traumatic brain injuries.

Research has proven creatine to be one of the most effective supplements for all athletes. It now shows that creatine can be used for optimizing both the body and the brain. There is a strong correlation between brain phosphocreatine stores and cognitive performance and neuroprotection.

A perfect stack for optimizing cognition is: tri-blend creatine to increase brain phosphocreatine stores, Amphetamax to improve cognition, focus, and mood, and Energy to improve energy and focus during the day.

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29704637

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11356982

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21394604

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4304302/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3205506/

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